Scroll Frame Covers: Body Stockings for my Scroll Frame

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When I began to use a scroll frame for the first time I sewed together two rectangles of very stretchy fabric to make a "tube top" and a "tube skirt" to cover the areas that I wasn't currently stitching. Photobucket

It worked very well but as I was stitching it occurred to me that I could also use sections of very stretchy hosiery to make seam free covers. For my first try I found a pair black and grey patterned Queen sized trouser sock. It worked very well but I when I parked my needle in the cover it was too well camouflaged. So I bought a pair of opaque pink little girl tights.

First I cut one whole leg and used it to cover one end. I pulled it onto the frame until I had covered about half the frame. The cut end naturally curled when it was stretched and I encouraged it to roll a little more. Then I folded it back to make a pocket.

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I tucked the foot end in at the end of the frame.

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I cut off the other leg of the stocking and pulled it onto the frame at the other end. I pulled it a little further than half and rolled the end back. I tucked in that foot as well. (Note that stockings securely hold the rectangles of acid free paper that I use to cover the exposed rolled edges.)

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Then I used three elastics to attach the chart. (I have found that the elastics make the best line markers that I have ever used.) I can use the pocket at the front to hold a skein of floss...

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... and the one at the back to hold my scissors. I can also slide a small ziplock of floss into the other stocking between stitching sessions. Between sessions I also have the option of unfolding the folded end to completely cover the fabric.

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As sleek as the frames look with the stockings stretched over the ends it is easier to install and remove the covers when they are cut to length. By the time I was ready to stitch the next section I had figured out how long that I wanted the two sections of stocking. I cut them a bit longer than required so that I could roll the ends. To stitch the section that is closest to the edge of the frame I folded the stocking twice, so that there were three layers. The handy thing about this is that it gives me a pocket no matter which end of the frame I'm using at the top, ie. when I wish to turn it upside down I have a pocket that won't drop the scissors.

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This frame measures less than 6 inches between the dowels so the little girl tights (size 38-50 lbs) were big enough to stretch over my frame. If I ever use larger frames women's tights might do the job, if I can find them in a colour that doesn't hide the needle. (I also noticed some men's microfiber knee high stockings that were very stretchy.) For even wider frames I could go back to sewing rectangles of stretchy fabric into tubes. Or I could knit some ribbed tubes from light weight yarn. I know that I could also use rectangles of interfacing held in place with elastic(s)...

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...but I would miss the pockets!

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Pinwheel 2010

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